Mongolian GDP, Commodities, and Growth: A Bull Market

Mongolia's GDP has swung from 2011's 17% growth to a mere 1.6% in 2016, back up to a 5% or more growth that exceeds that of saturated economies in the developed world. We'll walk through the country's GDP situation, and touch briefly on the commodity export market in the US. 

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Mongolian Economics: Monetary Policy

 

Mongolia’s financial sector grew from a centrally planned, Soviet-style single bank system to its present composition of fourteen commercial banks, seventeen licensed insurance related companies, 62 stock & brokerage related institutions, 518 Non-Banking Financial institutions (NBFIs), and about 280 Savings and Credit Co-operatives (SCCs). All banks are under supervision by Bank of Mongolia (“BoM”) the country’s central bank, while all NBFIs, SCCs and brokerage and insurance companies report to FRC.

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Legal Environment in Mongolia

Under the Soviet regime, all land in Mongolia was owned and collectively managed by the state. The 1992 constitution allowed for different forms of private land and immovable property tenure. Apartments were privatized by the thousands, as were industrial centers, farms and livestock. However, partially due to low population densities, the vast majority of land remained public property.

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Pushing forward infrastructure in Mongolia

Mongolia faces a daunting task in improving its physical infrastructure, but has an administration with the ability to do it. On the back of stronger economic performance in the last year and pragmatic policy making, Fitch anticipated that the country’s construction industry will grow from MNT1017bn this year to 1589bn MNT in 2020.

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LendMN: The Vanguard of the Mongolian Silicon Valley

One of the most exciting events in the Mongolian financial market this year was the IPO of LendMN, which became the first non-banking financial institution (NBFI) to be listed on the Mongolian Stock Exchange. 

 

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The Story of the Tugrik: Stability Increases Investment

For investors investing across international borders, the foreign exchange rate can be incredibly important. If the currency is devaluing fast, any gains on investment into assets valued in that currency can be significantly diminished. Mongolia’s exchange rate (against the US dollar) has not done well in the last few years, due to government policies against foreign investment, but shows signs of stabilizing, as the government has reversed its policies.

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Investing Climate in Mongolia

Financing sources underpinning investment since 2010 show Mongolia is heavily dependent on FDI, and the sharp drop from 2013-2015 has since picked up. While FDI sharply fell over the last few years, public investment financed by the government budget and DBM rapidly increased, relying on domestic and external debt financing. Looking forward, Mongolia has certain particular areas that foreign investors can enjoy for the time being.

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Tax Guidance for Property Investment in Mongolia

Taxes in Mongolia can be difficult to navigate, so we condensed and shortened some of our 2018 Mongolia Real Estate Report to give to you as useful content for investing in an exciting emerging market. 

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