Balancing the books: S&P upgrades Mongolian sovereign credit rating

Standard & Poor’s upgraded their rating for Mongolian sovereign debt from ‘B-’ to ‘B’ with a stable outlook. The news echoes wider confidence that IMF-led reforms and stronger commodity prices have put government finances back on an even keel. S&P is the third ratings agency this year to upgrade their Mongolia outlook, behind Moody’s and Fitch.

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Asian Development Bank revises Mongolia growth outlook for 2018

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) has revised their projected growth statistics for Mongolia in 2018 and 2019. The forecast for this year was raised to 6.4%, significantly higher than the previous estimate of 3.8%. This momentum is expected to continue into 2019, with the ADB upping their forecast from 4.3% to 6.1%. The announcement underscores growing investor confidence in the country, and echoes a wider consensus that an economic rebound is firmly underway.

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Risks and considerations when investing in property abroad

Finding the right city to invest in is the key. Do not restrict yourself to the area in which you live in.

International property investments are being considered as an additional investment product for many investors around the world.

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Mongolian GDP, Commodities, and Growth: A Bull Market

Mongolia's GDP has swung from 2011's 17% growth to a mere 1.6% in 2016, back up to a 5% or more growth that exceeds that of saturated economies in the developed world. We'll walk through the country's GDP situation, and touch briefly on the commodity export market in the US. 

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Mongolian Economics: Monetary Policy

 

Mongolia’s financial sector grew from a centrally planned, Soviet-style single bank system to its present composition of fourteen commercial banks, seventeen licensed insurance related companies, 62 stock & brokerage related institutions, 518 Non-Banking Financial institutions (NBFIs), and about 280 Savings and Credit Co-operatives (SCCs). All banks are under supervision by Bank of Mongolia (“BoM”) the country’s central bank, while all NBFIs, SCCs and brokerage and insurance companies report to FRC.

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Legal Environment in Mongolia

Under the Soviet regime, all land in Mongolia was owned and collectively managed by the state. The 1992 constitution allowed for different forms of private land and immovable property tenure. Apartments were privatized by the thousands, as were industrial centers, farms and livestock. However, partially due to low population densities, the vast majority of land remained public property.

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Pushing forward infrastructure in Mongolia

Mongolia faces a daunting task in improving its physical infrastructure, but has an administration with the ability to do it. On the back of stronger economic performance in the last year and pragmatic policy making, Fitch anticipated that the country’s construction industry will grow from MNT1017bn this year to 1589bn MNT in 2020.

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LendMN: The Vanguard of the Mongolian Silicon Valley

One of the most exciting events in the Mongolian financial market this year was the IPO of LendMN, which became the first non-banking financial institution (NBFI) to be listed on the Mongolian Stock Exchange. 

 

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